It’s About All of Us: Tell Your Students What You Are

I’m posting the latest  from mixinminao (Geoff Johnson) because he is having some technical difficulties with his computer. Here is the hardest working activist in America’s latest post:

Most of you reading this are serious adjunct/contingent activists who are all too aware of how damaging adjunct working conditions are to your life economically, physically, emotionally, psychically. . . and I could go on.  You may also be aware of how it hurts students, the institution, and contract/full-time employees as well.  You may also be aware that people have written about this at length and that in the face of it, movement on much of the issue has been, with but a few exceptions, glacial at best.

Part of this is because every time we broach the issue on our campuses during activist events like Campus Equity Week or Adjunct Action Day, we spend more time having to tell students what an adjunct is, than being able to get students to actively work towards the reduction of adjunct instruction, and the betterment of adjunct working conditions.

At the beginning of every term, I ask the students in my classes on the first day how many of them know what an “adjunct” (what I choose to call myself) is.  Because of the heightened activism on my local campuses, I will now be lucky if I can get three or more students out of a class of 30 who can tell me; and I, unlike 90% of my colleagues actually ask my students about the term.  Most teachers, maybe think that to ask and answer such a question is “whining.”  What this effectively means is that these adjunct instructors have decided that these work conditions, as injurious as they are to not only to the students, the institution, and society, are really about themselves.  In other words, these adjuncts internalize their exploitation and put on the “brave face” to make their teaching appear “seamless” in quality comparison with the full-time instructor.  It’s as if students shouldn’t know that, unlike the full-time instructor:

  1. You have other jobs to go to, which significantly limits your students’ access to you.
  2. You may teach more classes than a full-timer out of necessity, meaning:
  3. You will need more time to return graded work with fewer comments
  4. You may appear harried or even disorganized when you come into class
  5. You teach at multiple sites, so:
  6. You may not be fully aware of the outside institutional resources for students
  7. Know enough about other instructors to recommend to motivated students
  8. Be fully aware of what is taught in prerequisite or follow-up classes

The fact of the matter is that it is and should be our job to inform students of these realities. Contrary to what many may believe, it’s not as if students are going to flee from your classes in droves.  Many students are tied to your classes because of their own tight schedules, and because so many of us teach at peak times with classes that are already impacted.  Many students have no choice but to take your classes, so do the right thing, tell them, prepare them.  Make it clear that you will do your best to provide that student with a quality education, but that the institution creates barriers and limits generally unseen, but nonetheless there.

At the same time, there is another problem, and many instructors particularly at the community college level can attest to this: many of our students are themselves working effectively as adjunct or contingent labor.  Even when students are informed about the adjunct situation, many of them will feel to a degree more resentful than sympathetic, and when one starts talking to students about this, it’s easy to understand why.

Few if any students have the stable, 40 hour-week-job (and if they’re students, it’s often better they don’t).  The bigger problem though is that many work at jobs for which full-time or stable employment is not an option.  In order to avoid having to provide insurance for their employees, or in some cases, to simply keep them “hungry for hours,” businesses will purposefully under-employ students who are also underpaid with respect to being able to cover basic needs.  Further, these jobs will lack any kind of security.  Even at better businesses which will provide an elite few workers full-time employment and benefits, there is a sort of two-tier-ification going on in which the vast majority will work the part-time, underpaid, no benefit job (sound familiar adjuncts?)

For some students, the jobs they work aren’t even jobs, but rather “gigs”.  All hail the rise of the “independent contractor” who works for outfits like Uber and Lyft.  These ‘contractors” are our students, and they quite often get paid worse than us and treated even more shabbily.

Now I can hear some adjuncts say, “…but they’re students,” and/or “these are transitional jobs.”  To them I say, “You need to talk to your students.”  Many of them have been doing this for years, and many may finish with degrees and still find themselves doing such work for a time. I would also say you need to look at the world beyond yourself.  The term “starving students” used to be more of a figurative than literal statement.  Recent reports show that up to 10% of students in the CSU or California State University system are homeless.  This is the largest four-year system in the country, with over 300,000 students.  We’re talking about 30,000 people with lives and aspirations and families in just one state school system.  And I’m not including the one in five have food security issues.

And yes, there are homeless adjuncts in California, but 30,000?  Do one in five California adjuncts have food security issues?

To reach these students, we need to ask for more than understanding.  We need to show empathy, and we need to show that we care about their lives, not just as students in our classrooms, but as people, sons, daughters, mothers, fathers, and the very future of our nation.

And this all ties back to labor contingency.  A main contributor to the problems associated with the record income and wealth inequity in this country is that labor contingency which we all know too well in academia is exploding in the general workforce.  In a recent report given on the NPR program Marketplace, it was stated that up to 35% of the nation’s workforce is contingent labor with it expected to rise to 65-70% in the coming decades if unabated.  When people wonder why, in spite of falling employment wages have not risen, here’s one of their answers as to why.

In some respects, I would argue that labor contingency is potentially as serious and destabilizing a force as global warming.  Funny, but if people actually thought of it in those terms, would we have to waste our time as activists telling students “what an adjunct is”?

In short you need to make your students SEE your situation, and you need to SEE theirs.  To truly make any progress on the adjunct/contingent front, we need to do it from the beginning.  See this task for what it is: a moral, social, and yes a PROFESSIONAL obligation.

 

 

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6 thoughts on “It’s About All of Us: Tell Your Students What You Are

  1. Pingback: Fighting Labor Contingency: Getting Teacher Unions to Work with the Larger Labor Community | The Adjunct Crisis

  2. One of the reasons I worry about telling my students about my position as an adjunct (at least early in the course) is that I worry that doing so will undermine me. I want my students to give me the same respect and value the education they receive from me as much as they would from a full professor. I worry that if I tell them about my status, that they will not place as much value on my class, and that in turn I am doing them a disservice by inviting them to get less out of the course. I also worry that some students could drop the class if they felt that it wouldn’t be as “good” as another option, and losing the enrollments could threaten my job security. By week 8 or 9 of the term, once we have established a rapport and developed a strong learning environment in the classroom, then I feel comfortable sharing information about what it means to be an adjunct, but I am scared to do so at the outset. Other thoughts?

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Exactly! It’s just like when I go to McDonalds and while waiting for my Big Mac am given the option by the server to sign a petition supporting $15/hr living minimum wage. I just LOVE that when it happens and it’s horrible McDonald managers oppose that dynamic example of social democracy.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. To the last two posters, may I suggest giving students a first-day assignment. Ask them to ask their other teachers if they are adjuncts or not, and then to find out what an adjunct is. Make them tell you what an adjunct is, then tell them. Do you honestly think pretending you’re not one (or simply acting by omission) makes a difference?

    My observation is that many students actually prefer adjuncts to full-timers because they are “hungrier” teachers, both figuratively and literally. They are more likely to judge by your works.

    Ted, I stood alongside fast food workers and played an active role in the “Fight for 15.” Some workers walked out on the jobs during the rallies, and other workers, who were off-duty, were right there. In San Diego, it led to the passage of Prop I, which immediately raised the local minimum wages to $11.50 an hour effective July 11th, and it was part of a statewide campaign that forced Jerry Brown to eventually raise the minimum wage to 15 an hour by 2022, and henceforth peg the state minimum wage to inflation.

    I saw similar courage among female janitors (most immigrants) who endured sexual harassment and abuse to win a contract for $14 a hour just this month.

    How is it that these most marginalized of figures could find the courage to stand up for themselves?
    Pride I guess.

    I hope you find that courage somewhere too.

    Geoff Johnson

    Liked by 1 person

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